Things I Ate in Japan

What I ate in Japan

Surprisingly, even though I had a LOOONG list of things I wanted to eat in Japan, we didn’t eat a whole lot this time. The reasons were that it was ridiculously hot and also my buddy had a habit of forgetting to eat, so I ended up not eating as much either.

Here are the things that I did eat, however.

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The first day we were TIRED AF after the flight and so we had a shower and then went out for my favourite – cheap sushi. At places like this a plate of sushi costs about 100 yen. If you’re in the UK, that’s about 60p right now. Yeah, go cry into your Yo Sushi.

This was at a place called Genki Sushi, which was cute because you order your plates on a screen then they come to you on these little trains. It was ADORABLE.

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As soon as we got to my Japanese hometown of Ise, it was time for akafuku. These are the purple sweets you see above – pounded rice (mochi) covered in smooth adzuki beans. They are the speciality there, you see, and people come from all over to sit with some green tea and enjoy the cakes. The family-owned business is so important they pretty much control everything in the town, which is kinda pants because they have said some pretty racist things in the past. I should boycot them but if you boycotted everything that is racist in Japan you’d be sat in a corner doing nothing all week.

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I had the icecream in one hand and my DSLR in the other so dammit I couldn’t get the light right here. BUT this is my FAVOURITE icecream, also from my Japanese hometown. It’s tofu icecream. No, really.

It’s creamy, but not in a diary way like with milky icecream. Instead it has such a subtle taste that’s absolutely amazing. It’s pretty rare though so grab it if you see it!

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I guess it makes sense that I ate the most in my hometown. There was so much that I missed. The above curry is one that I used to go to when I felt homesick, because British people feel that curry is a huge part of our identity. However, when I went back home I had some other curry and it wasn’t nearly as good as this stuff. It really is the best in the world. They make the naan fresh – my choice is always the butter naan.

It was so good meeting up with all my friends in Ise. I miss them so much. I think although I have a habit of feeling very lonely at times, I understated how loved I am back there. I got very teary when it was time to say goodbye.

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Over in Osaka we met up with another friend of mine who gave us a great walking tour. Grabbing something quick before parting ways, we found this restaurant that specialised in fried stuff.

People think Japanese food is all healthy but actually they LOVE to deep fry stuff. The above fried things are a massive prawn, and two Japanese croquettes (I think they were minced beef and prawn). That dollop of Japanese potato salad was my favourite though <3

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Here’s a secret – I actually dislike Kyoto. Too many people. Too many cars. They’ve not protected their sacred city well enough to make it enjoyable. So, after an unsuccessfull bike ride in the city, we made ourselves feel happy again with Japanese McDonalds. I had the prawn burger (Japan limited).

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My friend went for the Big Mac, to see how it compared. He said it was around the same as a British one, but the fries “sucked” as they were too salty. In the UK they don’t salt them any more, apparently. The last time I had Maccy D’s was in Germany so I have no idea.

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Green tea icecream. Because it was just too damned hot.

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In Kyoto we stayed in this really cool Airbnb and the girls there pointed us in the direction of this SUPER cheap restaurant. A set menu cost 1000 yen (if you’re in the UK that’s around £6). Above is the one I got on my first night. It was the most amazing kara-age fried chicken I’ve ever tasted.

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…followed by some yuzu icecream!

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These are the best cream puffs in Japan – I can say that with confidence! You can find them on the hill going towards Kiyomizu Temple in Kyoto. They come in cinamon-vanilla or green tea. The perfect snack!

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Cold udon noodles are perfect on a hot day. Watch out for that raw yolk in there – can make some people feel ill!

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On out last night I had Korean food instead of Japanese – bibimbap. Rice and veg and kimchi… AHHH it’s one of my favourite foods.

So are you hungry now?

What’s your favourite Japanese food?

Comments

  1. OMG yes – I love this post – so much ice cream! And YUM to prawn burger and fried stuffs and sushi and and and… where is the ramen????????????
    Vanessa recently posted…Friday LinksMy Profile

    • Charlotte says:

      I don’t do ramen so much! I have to be careful with gluten, and besides, it makes my nose run!!

  2. This was so fun to read! I love food posts like this! You tried so many interesting things! Tofu and green tea ice cream! I would 100& try that as well as the akafuku, cream puffs, and pretty much everything else you ate!
    ~Sara
    Sara Strauss recently posted…Etsy FavesMy Profile

    • Charlotte says:

      Ice cream is pretty much always a winner anyway! You’ll have to come to Japan with me next time!

  3. Goodness! These affordable prices are making me re-evaluate my SE Asia trip and perhaps changing my mind. I might have to check out Japan after all, even though I thought it was quite expensive compared to other places. But 60p for a plate of sushi? Heaven!

    • Charlotte says:

      It really was very cheap! I’m not sure about flights from the US but from the EU even those are cheap now.

  4. I love this post because its written so well it actually made my stomach turn.. haha. Love trying new foods and I really love Sushi. But I would be so terrified. I’m sure all of these taste fantastic but the look would offset me! I guess one of these days Ill have to make it to Japan to try it as Im sure its all super YUMMY! LOVE me some kimchi though!
    Hanley Russell recently posted…When life hands you lemons..My Profile

    • Charlotte says:

      Aww thank you!
      Terrified of sushi? It’s soooo good though! Kimchi ftw – one of the world’s healthiest foods!

  5. //Here’s a secret – I actually dislike Kyoto. Too many people. Too many cars. They’ve not protected their sacred city well enough to make it enjoyable.//

    YES I feel the exact same way, or well, i did for a long time, but then I really enjoyed my last trip to Kyoto so now I’m coming around on it and have a lot of favorite places there now, but I just have to never ever ride a Kyoto bus again. I still hate though just walking around between temples and shrines and it’s all perfectly ordinary concrete gray buildings and big streets full of cars. Completely ruins the vibe. And then tourists everywhere of course.

    • Charlotte says:

      I think if you go when there are slightly fewer people, it can be good there. But the town needs serious planning to have all those people and cars and buses there!

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